Tuesday, 4 March 2008

Controversial? Moi? I Wish I Could Be

Is this guy for real?
"The President of the Social Democratic Party (PSD), Mario Viegas Carrascalão, believes the attacks against PR Ramos-Horta and PM Xanana Gusmão to have been caused by an international political conspiracy.“Maybe the groups doing the attack were backed by some people. There were rumours that there was USD20000 found in Alfredo’s pocket when he died. Some people may have given him this money before he died, or put the money in his pocket after he died. His body may have been dumped in Metiaut after being shot in another place,” said Mr. Carrascalão. Carrascalão also reiterated his desire for Timor-Leste to establish an International Independent Commission of Inquiry to investigate the events shrouded in so much mystery. "
So what do you want exactly Mario? An International Commission of Inquiry to investigate what you believe is an International conspiracy? Or are you, as usual, saying the first thing that comes into your head just to make sure you get some publicity and also manage to spread a little shit in the hope that it sticks?

Curfew and All That.
I have to say I love it. I know that is completely selfish but I just can’t help it. As I’ve said before, I get a good night’s sleep and all the rest of the benefits but I would also be interested to see the burglary and robbery figures for the past few weeks compared to the 3 weeks prior to February 11th. Now I know a curfew is a bit harsh to get the crime figures down but I bet it works. You know what they say: “Spare the rod and spoil the child”. Maybe a benevolent dictator is what’s needed for a few years. Then again, maybe the burglary/robbery figures will be evened out by the number of Timorese (and some Malae) who have been punched in the face for being 'too close to curfew' by our ever vigilant security forces.

Dear National Security Forces.
Instead of sticking M16’s in the faces of terrified taxi drivers whilst screaming and pulling off their tinted car window screens, why don’t you lead by example and take the tints off your own vehicles? And put some fucking number plates on your cars while you’re at it. Just a friendly suggestion in the sacred name of public relations.

A Man Apart
It’s good to see that JRH is up and walking around. Not bad for a man of his age and a couple of high velocity rounds. Maybe it’s about time another former Minister got out of his hospital bed, walked around and considered coming home to his country. I’m sure he would get a very warm welcome.

Words that should be banned in Timor Leste, in ANY language:
Consultation (if it means appeasment)
Reconciliation (see above)
Dialogue (see above above)
Workshop (unless used in the context of light engineering)
Justice (unless you really really mean it).

A Breath Of Fresh Air
For my Dili based reader I can do no more than recommend that you go out each Thursday morning and try to hunt down a copy of a new newspaper, the Dili Weekly. I wish I could put a link to this publication but unfortunately they do not have a web site yet. If there is anyone out there who could offer their services FREE as a website designer/host etc I bet they would jump at the opportunity.
The Dili Weekly is a 24 page newspaper, published in English and Tetum, 12 pages each language. The Tetum version is a translation of some of the English and vice-versa. I suspect that the editorials and the major political stories are written in English and translated into Tetum and the more ‘community based’ and local court pieces are Tetum/English. For myself I can say that it is an absolute pleasure to read some ‘real’ news, some excellent editorials and know that the East Timorese now have access to some real journalism. Below is a scanned version of a recent editorial. I suspect it says what a lot of us living here are thinking but for various reasons cannot say. I also respect the integrity and courage of the publishers and journalists working on the paper. It’s about time. I have scanned in below the most recent editorial (with the writters permission).
Again, for my Dili based reader if you want to know where to get a copy, or better still advertise in the paper, you can call 7365432 for details of distribution or 7313854 for advertising. And no, I am not getting anything for this plug. I just think it’s a worthy cause.
Well,,,,,, I tried to upload it in a fairly big format but the system just wouldn't let me. So, for my overseas reader (that's you, 'worried momma') I'll type the whole thing out for you. Now that's dedication:
Opinion
Optimism Turns Sour As Salsinha Walks Free. Jesse Wright, Editor.
"Since Alfredo Alves died two weeks ago there has been a steady stream of speculation as to who would be the next in line. As though this country would be lost without some sort of forest rebel leader.
Of course the follow up to this question was, would Gastao Salsinha be able to live up to his predecessor? Would he be able to continue the fight?
Unusually for me I allowed myself a bit of careless optimism and I hypothesized that one one would replace Alves. I suggested Timor would have learned its lesson and would actually hunt Salsinha down and catch him without delay. I assumed Timor would do everything it could to avoid a repeat of the Alves incident.
I stand corrected.
It weeks later and any every journalist who gives enough of a damn to go to Ermera has been able to locate Salsinha and splash his rebel face on TV screens (and newspapers and radios) around the world. Meanwhile those tasked with his capture stand by.
I understand and applaud SRSG Atul Khare's position that dialog (sic) and peaceful surrender is better than a firefight. Who could argue with that? It's the sort of position position (sic) befitting the United Nations.
What I do not understand is the government's ready acquiescence to such advice despite its own promises to the contrary. Both Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao as well as interim President Araujo have said the time for talk is over. At the inauguration of the joint command last week Gusmao made a particularly impassioned speech in which he said he would not tolerate the rebels and that their time is over.
But is it? The weekend came and went with no outward sign of change. Salsinha, meanwhile, was available by phone and in person should one need a sound byte.
This whole situation smacks of history repeating itself. The last time we tried to negotiate with egotistical rebel leaders, President Jose Ramos-Horta ended up hospitalized. Salsinha himself is allegedly responsible for at least three bullet holes in the PM's car. Remember? What must the man do before the country makes a serious effort to stop him?
The way the situation new stands, Salsinha has nothing to win by turning himself in and has everything to win by "hiding" in Ermera. His leverage comes at the price of security; because he is a security risk the government is willing to negotiate with him. Should he walk into a police station and turn over his gun, he'd be just another guy in jail and any negotiation after that would likely be in court. If he looks at his own situation logically then he will realize there is no benefit to surrender at present. He might surrender in a year or two - following some protracted dialog (sic) process - in exchange for a wildly underserved pardon or. But in any case, who really believes dialog (sic) with egotistical rebel leaders results in a safer country? Is it too much to suggest that dialog (sic) should be given only to peaceful petitioners who do not pose a security risk for the state? Apparently it is."
Three cheers for the Dili Weekly....

Conspiracy theory #3200174
Has anyone questioned Timor Telecom yet?

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10 comments:

Anonymous said...

What Mario Carrascalao wants and by the way most Timorese want is a complete investigation which results reflects the truth of what happened on the 11th of February. By having aussies and yankees doing that investigation the result will be deja-vue! It was all organized by the spirit of Saddam Hussein and his mate Osama Bin Laden.
Get real man!

In regards to your wingheing (sorry for the spelling) about the burgarly at your place: Get real too. I live in Perth for the past 33 years, and the burgarlies, crimes and so on that are committed every day in this city is horrendous. Now, since there is a "dole" payment to all those bastards that commit these crimes, isn't in your view that you are better off in Dili then in Perth?
You know what mate? If you cannot stand the heat get out of the Kitchen (if you have got one).

LUVYOU

Anonymous said...

Dear National Security Forces.
Instead of sticking M16’s in the faces of terrified taxi drivers whilst screaming and pulling off their tinted car window screens, why don’t you lead by example and take the tints off your own vehicles? And put some fucking number plates on your cars while you’re at it. Just a friendly suggestion in the sacred name of public relations.

I sincerely agree with you on this one.
LUVYOU

Anonymous said...

A Man Apart
It’s good to see that JRH is up and walking around. Not bad for a man of his age and a couple of high velocity rounds. Maybe it’s about time another former Minister got out of his hospital bed, walked around and considered coming home to his country. I’m sure he would get a very warm welcome

Why are you so worried about Rogerio Lobato being treated in Malaysia, and this authorized by the Timorese Tribunals?

You did not seem very worried when David Hicks spent 5 years in Guantanamo prison! If what he did is worth five years, what would you give Bushy and little Johnny for what they did in Iraq?

LUVYOU

fat old sod said...

Dear LUVYOU
You are a prize to be treasured. Looks like I've hooked a whopper,

love you LUVYOU

Wrick said...

"Salsinha has nothing to win by turning himself in and has everything to win by "hiding" in Ermera. His leverage comes at the price of security; because he is a security risk the government is willing to negotiate with him. Should he walk into a police station and turn over his gun, he'd be just another guy in jail and any negotiation after that would likely be in court."

Perhaps, just perhaps, like Alfredo, he knows too much. If it came to a court case, too much might be known about a certain revered leader. I put money on my opinion that Alfredo would not be taken alive. I've won that bet. I'm willing to do the same with Salsinha.

Incidentally, if the Timor Times people could let me know what kind of format they use for their paper (my guess is Adobe Acrobat) I could probably find a host site, and might be willing to do it for them. Alternatively, I could help them set it up as a free blog - check out mine at http://vensol.blogspot.com
Cheers
WF

Anonymous said...

Wrick,

I think people are tired of speculations and finger pointing.

Reinado would not have been dead if he had stayed put in his hiding hole.

Salsinha would not be the target of a hunt if he had not led an attack on the PM's motorcade, something he has admited doing.

Despite these being terrorist crimes against the state the authorities are being rather too understanding doing all they can so Salsinha can hand himself in alive and live. Some people are even criticising the autorities for being to soft on these people.

If he knows a lot he should try to stay alive and surrender rather than forcing the security forces to try capturing him by force. Then he could well die if he resists capture.

The decision to live or possible die is in his hands and the state cannot wait forever or be hostage to his whims. The nation must go on and Salsinha must act like a man surrender and answer for his actions.

If he ends up dying in a gunfight there is no one else to blame but himself. No one can blame the authorities for not giving him chances to resolve the stand off peacefully.

So stop twisting things around as if Alfredo and Salsinha were the victims here.

Get real!!

Wrick said...

I think you must have misunderstood my comment. I agree with everything you say - except perhaps the part about Reinado 'leaving his "hidey hole". Every man and his dog seemed to know where Reinado was holed up.

I don't think I was finger pointing anyway. Perhaps just waving it around a bit. I think most of the finger pointing occurred in 2006, and was pointed by a certain female Australian TV media identity who should have known better.

You must agree, there is a certain 'deja vu' in Salsinha's apparent behaviour - 'will he or won't he surrender ... that is the question'. And my question is, will he be captured alive.

Laro said...

Your comment on Carrascalao got me interested and I managed to get hold of the interview at Jornal National Semanario (at least teh one that shows in the March 8 edition). In the actual interview he says nothing about an international conspiracy!!! even though is all over the headline! My low opinion of timorese media (I am still giving a chance to Dili Weekly, w'll see) keeps getting lower every time I check the facts.

fat old sod said...

Dear laro
I would imagine the Dili Weekly are holding their collective breath in anticipiation of your 'critique'.

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